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Parking & transit

Garage Parking

Park in our West Market Garage for easy access to Lexington Market. Entrances are available off of Paca St. and Greene St.


24 Hours a Day, every day.

Up to 1 hour of parking costs $5.

OUR STORY

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ABOUT THE MARKET

Lexington Market is a place nearly as old as America itself — and its history of local food, community-rooted small business, and a space for all is the legacy we are proud to continue on today.

When we say that Lexington has “something for everyone,” it’s because after more than 200 years in operation, we still pride ourselves on having a diverse mix of local food and service vendors who are deeply rooted in Baltimore. Learn more about what makes us famous and even better — come see us in person!


Not to ring our own bell, but we have…

Baltimore Public Markets

The Baltimore Public Market System is the oldest public market system in the United States, operating six city-owned markets across Baltimore City. Unique among American cities, this network of neighborhood-based markets provide fresh food access, community gathering places, and hubs for local small businesses. Visit them all and become a Baltimore Market insider!

baltimoremarkets.org

200+

years of Lexington Market commerce, always in the heart of Baltimore City

60,000

square feet of merchant stalls, community gathering space, and history at the new Lexington Market

500+

plants and trees on our block-long public plaza adjoining the Market

Baltimore Public Markets

The Baltimore Public Market System is the oldest public market system in the United States, operating six city-owned markets across Baltimore City. Unique among American cities, this network of neighborhood-based markets provide fresh food access, community gathering places, and hubs for local small businesses. Visit them all and become a Baltimore Market insider!

baltimoremarkets.org

MARKET HISTORY

1782

1806

1818

1865

1871

1887

1933

1949

1963

1982

2022

PUBLIC ART

Located in the BROMO Arts & Entertainment District, Lexington Market has many significant works of art on the plaza and inside the main market hall - all done by local Baltimore artists. Come see all that the BROMO has to offer! Funded in partnership with the Municipal Art Society of Baltimore City.

“Robert & Rosetta”

by Oletha DeVane and Chris Kojzar

This piece on the Lexington Market Plaza pays homage to the two recorded instances of enslaved persons either being sold at the Market or hunted because of their connection to it. The piece seeks to seismically shift the principal idea behind ‘exchanging goods’ at the Market by displaying forged metal panels of the two individuals, Robert and Rosetta, to stand as aberrations to what one would advertise as ‘value.’ DeVane, the project’s lead, is a multidisciplinary artist who explores diverse political, social identities and cultural interpretations. Her work is in permanent museum collections at the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Reginald F. Lewis Museum, and she has exhibited at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Museum of the Bible in NY, and Museum of the Americas in Washington DC, among others. She did this piece in partnership with her son, multidisciplinary artist Chris Kojzar.

“Food Play”

by Reed Bmore, Nick Ireys, and Eric Smith

This playful sculpture on the Lexington Market Plaza explores our complex, but also fun and nostalgic, relationships with food through colorful folded pipe shapes meant for interaction. Lead artist Reed Bmore is known for their often unsanctioned and surprising bent wire sculptures hung at stoplights and street corners throughout Baltimore and other cities; he is a Baltimore resident and Maryland Institute College of Art graduate and completed this piece in collaboration with metalworkers Nick Ireys and Eric Smith.

“Our Ties to the Market”

by SHAN Wallace

Baltimore artist and photographer SHAN Wallace translates her years photographing Lexington Market’s vendors and customers into a large-scale collage piece on the Market’s focal wall on its upper market level. Wallace’s piece focuses on the history of Black food culture in Baltimore and America’s public markets, in general, and is a collaboration with culinary historian Dr. Jessica B. Harris, author of High on the Hog: How African American Cuisine Transformed America. Wallace is an award-winning visual artist, photographer, and educator from Baltimore; she has exhibited work internationally in galleries and museums including The Baltimore Museum of Art and The Annenberg Space for Photography in Los Angeles, CA.

“Home at Lexington Market”

by Ernest Shaw

Beloved Baltimore artist Ernest Shaw paints from his recollections of Lexington Market — and weaves in portraits and symbols from his other murals across the city. Illustrating the collective ethos of Lexington Market and its people, these works humanize and validate all those who spend time, energy, and resources at the market.

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